Submission Guide for the Biennial Conference

SRA Biennial Meeting Submission Guidelines

Ever wonder what makes a successful submission to the SRA biennial conference? Are you curious to know what criteria reviews use to evaluate proposals? Well now you don’t have to wonder anymore! Below are guidelines that will help you write a compelling submission to the SRA biennial conference.

Submission Guidelines

SRA Biennial Meeting Submission Guidelines

Ever wonder what makes a successful submission to the SRA biennial conference? Are you curious to know what criteria reviews use to evaluate proposals? Well now you don’t have to wonder anymore! Below are guidelines that will help you write a compelling submission to the SRA biennial conference.

Submission Guidelines

  1. Formulation and Conceptualization. Is the purpose, question, or issue clearly delineated and linked to the empirical, historical, analytical, or theoretical significance of the work? SRA discourages the submission of “promissory notes.” There must be enough empirical material in the abstract, coded and analyzed—even if not yet complete—to judge the merit of a submission.
  2. Methods. The various disciplines represented in SRA use a variety of methods. Therefore SRA encourages rigorous submissions from a variety of methodological approaches. Are the methods appropriate for the question asked or the purpose undertaken? For research posters or papers, is the method clearly presented, appropriately executed, solid and replicable, logically designed, matched in scope to the question? Descriptive case studies, single subject, and small-N designs, and other approaches are as appropriate as large group studies with statistical analyses. Are analyses appropriate for the data? Studies with analyses in progress may be acceptable if the designs and the analyses are well conceptualized.
  3. Interpretation. In relation to the focal question, issue, or purpose, is the interpretation appropriate? Is it justified in relation to the data and analyses, the material reviewed, or other information presented?
  4. Importance. Is the topic of scientific, scholarly, methodological, or theoretical importance? Is the content timely in relation to current issues or controversies? Is the content likely to be of interest to meeting attendees?
  5. Leading Edge Research, Diversity. The SRA strategic plan is intended to represent the future of the field as being interdisciplinary, international, attending to culture and diversity in an appropriate way, and/or having serious implications for policy. Hence, submissions with one or more of these qualities signify that they represent leading edge research that is desirable for the Biennial Meeting program.

These guidelines are made available by the Emerging Scholar Committee. Click here to learn more about ESC. We would like to thank Lene Jensen and Xinjin Chen for their contributions to this list.